Month: July 2020

Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 6 2020 College of Science associate professor and researcher David Feliciano has received a $667,000 grant from the Department of Defense to explore the cellular underpinnings of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), a developmental disorder characterized by the growth of benign tumors throughout the body, most notably in the brain. Young
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An international research collaboration, including Professor IIJIMA Kazumoto et al. (of the Department of Pediatrics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) has revealed that NPHS1 is a disease-susceptibility gene for steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome in children. The NPHS1 gene encodes nephrin, a component protein for the renal glomerulus slit diaphragm, which prevents protein from being passed
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There’s considerable controversy over whether “COVID toes”—red sores or lesions on the feet and hands in children and young adults—are truly caused by COVID-19. A new study published in the British Journal of Dermatology provides evidence in support of the link. In most cases, affected individuals test negative with traditional COVID-19 tests involving throat swabs
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 3 2020 Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have isolated human monoclonal antibodies that potentially can prevent a rare but devastating polio-like illness in children linked to a respiratory viral infection. The illness, called acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), causes sudden weakness in the
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 2 2020 A new study published recently in “BMC Pediatrics” shows a connection between the time of the month when low-income families receive their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits and the number of emergency room visits due to injuries to children from those families. Childhood injuries are the leading
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 1 2020 George Mason University Professor Dr. Kenneth W. Griffin, received $156,581 from National Health Promotion Associates for a project aimed at preventing prescription drug use among high school students. Griffin is a professor of global and community health in Mason’s College of Health and Human Services. His research focuses
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<h2>Research shows that punishing and shaming kids creates more misbehavior, not less.</h2><p>Consider this scenario:</p><p>You’ve fallen behind at work. You’re under the gun to finish a presentation and turn in an admittedly-sloppy final draft full of careless mistakes. You know you can do better, but you haven’t been feeling well, have had insomnia for the past
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In June 2018, Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were
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Jul 1 2020 Leading hygiene experts are stressing the importance of effective hand hygiene measures and education in schools as children begin returning to educational settings following the COVID-19 pandemic. The calls follow a new global survey conducted by The Global Hygiene Council (GHC) highlighting that almost half (42%) of children aged 5-10 are not
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